KODOKWAN JUDO & JU-JITSU CLUB OF ZAMBIA
KODOKWAN JUDO & JU-JITSU CLUB OF ZAMBIA
KODOKWAN JUDO & JU-JITSU CLUB OF ZAMBIA
KODOKWAN JUDO & JU-JITSU CLUB OF ZAMBIA
KODOKWAN JUDO & JU-JITSU CLUB OF ZAMBIA
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SEISHI TEPPEI

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SEISHI TEPPEI’S UNIQUE STYLE OF JUJITSU IN HONGKONG IN THE 1920’SKodokwan Judo & Ju-Jitsu

Written by Jonathan Kruger 2014 - © The first three paragraphs came from Guy Taylor's draft book
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© Guy Taylor The  Kodokwan jujitsu association is unique in the history of jujitsu in the west. When nearly all of the early jujitsu transmission from the Orient to the Occident consisted of unrelated collections of “jujitsu tricks”, which were often actually early judo, the Kodokwan jujitsu association was the repository of a complete and internally consistent jujitsu system.

© Guy Taylor This school might well no longer exist anywhere else in the world today.

© Guy Taylor What is further unique is that the techniques have been transmitted virtually unchanged down to the present day.The influence of Boxing,westling, judo or Karate were not added,which was unfortunately the fate of all of first jujitsu schools established outside of japan in the early part of the 20th century. Those that remain are changed almost beyond recognition as a result. In most cases they were absorbed into Kodokan Judo whose rise eclipsed many of the earlier schools and teachers who had predated it.

 

Written by Jonathan Kruger 2014- Henry Johnston arrived one day in Hong Kong and worked there for several years. It was while he was in Hong Kong (this would be some time in the 1920,s) that he met a Japanese sailor by the name of Seishi Teppei, also known sometimes as Yusei Teppei, in the period between 1920-1940, during which time a number of Japanese migrated from Japan to Hong Kong and other parts of China.


Henry Johnston was so amazed at what this man could do! And started to take instruction in jujitsu from him. Teppei at the time was teaching Tinjinshinyo ryu jujitsu to Johnston. Dr Johnston tells of many stories of his practice with this great Jujitsu man that when ever he showed a jujitsu technique to his students he would let them feel the pain of the atemi or lock so that they knew it worked if they ever had to use it in a practical situation!

 

We know little about Teppei´s early training. Aparenty he started training in Tenjinshinyo ryu jujitsu at a young age. So this must have been around 1890. It is believed that Teppei was from Fukuoka city in Kyushu and came from the samurai class and also learnt the family system of jujitsu from his father which was perfected with in their own family style of jujitsu over time. This unique style of jujitsu was kept a close secret by the Teppei family.

 

Seishi Teppei

 

Teppei had trained under some of the best jujitsu specialists of Tenjinshinyo ryu as seen by the style of jujitsu he passed on to Johnston. Teppei later went to Tokyo to study at the Kodokan in the early 1900's under shihan Jigoro Kano. During this time of study with Kano he had a falling out with the Kodokan.

Apparenty Seishi Teppei had quite a temper! And he did not like some of the ideas to promote the sole training of only judo at the Kodokan.Having grown up learning Jujitsu Teppei believed that the Kodokan should not restrict its teaching only to judo, but should incorporate and include other styles of jujitsu in order that the art of judo was to grow . Some of the old jujitsu masters still had a lot of knowledge that they could share with the Kodokan. And what they had to offer should not be brushed aside because of what they believed was inferior and out dated to the new art of judo.

We know very little why Teppei left the Kodokan, perhaps his temper got the better of him and he was told to leave the Kodokan.

 

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