KODOKWAN JUDO & JU-JITSU CLUB OF ZAMBIA
KODOKWAN JUDO & JU-JITSU CLUB OF ZAMBIA
KODOKWAN JUDO & JU-JITSU CLUB OF ZAMBIA
KODOKWAN JUDO & JU-JITSU CLUB OF ZAMBIA
KODOKWAN JUDO & JU-JITSU CLUB OF ZAMBIA
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SEISHI TEPPEI

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SEISHI TEPPEI’S UNIQUE STYLE OF JUJITSU IN HONGKONG IN THE 1920’SKodokwan Judo & Ju-Jitsu

Written by Jonathan Kruger 2014 - © The first three paragraphs came from Guy Taylor's draft book
Please note: No part of the materials including graphics and logos, available in this Website may be copied, photocopied, 
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© Guy Taylor The  Kodokwan jujitsu association is unique in the history of jujitsu in the west. When nearly all of the early jujitsu transmission from the Orient to the Occident consisted of unrelated collections of “jujitsu tricks”, which were often actually early judo, the Kodokwan jujitsu association was the repository of a complete and internally consistent jujitsu system.

© Guy Taylor This school might well no longer exist anywhere else in the world today.

© Guy Taylor What is further unique is that the techniques have been transmitted virtually unchanged down to the present day.The influence of Boxing,westling, judo or Karate were not added,which was unfortunately the fate of all of first jujitsu schools established outside of japan in the early part of the 20th century. Those that remain are changed almost beyond recognition as a result. In most cases they were absorbed into Kodokan Judo whose rise eclipsed many of the earlier schools and teachers who had predated it.

 

Written by Jonathan Kruger 2014- Henry Johnston arrived one day in Hong Kong and worked there for several years. It was while he was in Hong Kong (this would be some time in the 1920,s) that he met a Japanese sailor by the name of Seishi Teppei, also known sometimes as Yusei Teppei, in the period between 1920-1940, during which time a number of Japanese migrated from Japan to Hong Kong and other parts of China.


Henry Johnston was so amazed at what this man could do! And started to take instruction in jujitsu from him. Teppei at the time was teaching Tinjinshinyo ryu jujitsu to Johnston. Dr Johnston tells of many stories of his practice with this great Jujitsu man that when ever he showed a jujitsu technique to his students he would let them feel the pain of the atemi or lock so that they knew it worked if they ever had to use it in a practical situation!

 

We know little about Teppei´s early training. Aparenty he started training in Tenjinshinyo ryu jujitsu at a young age. So this must have been around 1890. It is believed that Teppei was from Fukuoka city in Kyushu and came from the samurai class and also learnt the family system of jujitsu from his father which was perfected with in their own family style of jujitsu over time. This unique style of jujitsu was kept a close secret by the Teppei family.

 

Seishi Teppei

 

Teppei had trained under some of the best jujitsu specialists of Tenjinshinyo ryu as seen by the style of jujitsu he passed on to Johnston. Teppei later went to Tokyo to study at the Kodokan in the early 1900's under shihan Jigoro Kano. During this time of study with Kano he had a falling out with the Kodokan.

Apparenty Seishi Teppei had quite a temper! And he did not like some of the ideas to promote the sole training of only judo at the Kodokan.Having grown up learning Jujitsu Teppei believed that the Kodokan should not restrict its teaching only to judo, but should incorporate and include other styles of jujitsu in order that the art of judo was to grow . Some of the old jujitsu masters still had a lot of knowledge that they could share with the Kodokan. And what they had to offer should not be brushed aside because of what they believed was inferior and out dated to the new art of judo.

We know very little why Teppei left the Kodokan, perhaps his temper got the better of him and he was told to leave the Kodokan.

 


THE NAME KODOKWAN

When Teppei went to Hong Kong working as a sailor,he opened up his own club called:The Kodokwan Jujitsu Club(KJJC) The club logo was a badge of three arms linked together in a around circle.It is not clear were he got the idea for this badge, perhaps it was from an old jujitsu scroll.

The club motto was: THRICE ARMED IS HE WHO KODOKWAN JUJITSU KNOWS.

Shihan Joe Grant-Grierson the Great Grand Master and president of the South African Kodokwan Jujitsu Association who holds a 10th Dan in Kodokwan jujitsu later drew and re designed the club badge to what it is today from the early 1960s.

Teppei's Kodokwan has a(W)in the spelling,the reason for this was because he wanted it to be spelt different from the original Jigoro Kano's Kodokan. But the meaning of the word still remains the same (KODOKWAN) The name (KODOKAN) means (the hall where the way is taught)          

Another reason for the change is the old Japanese pronunciation for the word (kan) was pronounced as (kwan). Perhaps this is the reason that Teppei used the pronunciation of kwan in his style of Kodokwan. As Teppei was living in Hong Kong the Chinese pronunciation of Kodokan is (Chan tao kwan) this could be another reason for given it the (kwan)on the end of the word to give it a unique Chinese feel.

Shihan Teppei was known as a Jujitsu master that said the only way to know if a Jujitsu technique really worked was to try it in a practical situation. And the best place for this was in back streets of down town Hong Kong, he especially liked to practice his skills on the big English Sailors hanging out in some of the local back street bars.

Teppei at times was known to like his Japanese sake(rice wine) which did not help the situation any better with his red hot temper. This was told to us by the Late grand master Joe Grant Grierson. Teppei was not known as not a very big Japanese man which made it quite easy for him to be picked by any drunk foreign sailor. And at the time Teppei was in Hong Kong Japanese sailors were looked down on by the western community living in Hong kong.

 

Seishi Teppei soon learnt how to take on the western boxing styles and how also to move around and avoid their punches and then bridge the gap between him and the opponent and strike the man with Atemi to break his balance before throwing him or locking him up to finish the fight. During his time in Hong Kong Teppei was never defeated by any one local or foreign.

It is said that Teppei later returned to Japan after the war in 1948, Japan after the war had no place for an old jujitsu master, Japans interest turned to things western and he lead a quiet life in his old age. All contact with him was lost after that.

 

 

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